Category Archives: Mission

Trip to the Usa

We fly to the USA on June 25th! Here’s an outline of where we’ll be so far:

  • June 25- July 8  Western NY
  • July 9-16 Nashville TN area
  • August 2-12- New England area
  • August 13-20 New York
  • August 21-Return to Ireland

Please get in touch soon if you would like to try to catch up with us this summer, whether that’s a chat on the back porch or speaking in your church. Even if you don’t see your area mentioned above, it still might be possible to fit something in!

This will be our first trip back since joining Communitas International last year. We would love an opportunity to talk with you about this change and about the changing Ireland we are living in and the challenges this presents to sharing the gospel and planting churches.

Speaking of Changes…

Life is always full of change but don’t some stages feel like there is a lot more than others? This stage for us has brought many changes. On both of our last two summer trips to the US, we have had one of our children getting married! This time we will be leaving Brian behind in Ireland, and Colm and Scott will be spending most of the summer in Tennessee with Julia and Hunter and working Summer jobs. So for much of the summer, we will only have Sarah with us, which will be very different!

There are always lots of changes to catch up with when we return to the US too. Since our last visit, Mom Nesbitt has moved into Martha’s brother Andy’s home, and her care needs have increased.  We’ll be staying there when we are in NY.  With a big family, there is always lots going on- weddings, new babies, graduations, etc. Over the Fourth of July weekend, the Nesbitt Clan all gather at Pine Hill for an extended family reunion. This year marks the 90th year we have held the reunion so even more than the usual hundred plus are expected to attend.  We are looking forward to reconnecting with cousins and aunts and uncles, as well as to some time with most of Martha’s siblings in town at the same time- which doesn’t happen often anymore!

I’m sure you find that society as a whole is changing so rapidly it’s hard to keep up. In Ireland for a number of reasons this pace is super-accelerated, and as mentioned this poses many challenges to how we live, work and share Jesus here. Please do continue to pray for wisdom and boldness. Our last few weeks are always filled with meeting up with people one more time before we leave for two months. Pray for grace and wisdom in all we say.

Scott is in the midst of his Leaving Certificate, the state exams here that determine colleges placements. In total, he will have sat over 24 hours of exams in 7 subjects over two weeks, being tested on the entire curriculum of the last two years of school. It’s a very stressful time for students here. Please keep him in your prayers. His last exam is on the 19th.

Thank you so much for your prayer and support

New Mission Agency!!

We are now with Communitas International! After months of research, prayer, and conversation, we applied to and were accepted with Communitas. We found Communitas to be a good fit with our vision to help develop local communities of people who seek to know and follow Jesus, and to help people experience a true and transforming relationship with Jesus daily. We want to help and encourage every follower to be a fisher (Matthew 4:19). By joining Communitas we will be part of a wider network of church planters across Europe and around the world. Communitas has over 100 church planting projects at various stages in about 40 cities in Europe and 20 cities in the Americas.We look forward to the mutual encouragement and learning this will bring as we share the journey.

 

The Story of God and Guinness

Here is an interesting article about Arthur Guinness who was born in Celbridge the town were we live. It is a pity that Guinness is not still in the Guinness family today.

Picture aArthur_Guinness young man sitting in a large cathedral in Ireland with his wife and small children. He lives around the time of our founding fathers and is a rising entrepreneur in Dublin. His name is Arthur Guinness, and he is a brewer, and it is hard to exaggerate just how important beer was to the people of Guinness’ day.
Guinness lived at a time when no one understood micro-organisms and how disease is spread. They routinely drank from the same waters in which they dumped their garbage and their sewage. Unknowingly, they polluted the rivers and lakes around their cities. People died as a result, and this made nearly everyone in Guinness’ day avoid water entirely. Instead, they drank alcoholic beverages.
Usually, this was done in moderation and all was well. Occasionally, though, excess set in and drunkenness plagued the land. This is what happened in the years just before Guinness was born, in the period historians call “The Gin Craze.” Parliament had forbidden the importation of liquor in 1689, so the people of Ireland and Britain began making their own. It was too much temptation. Drunkenness became the rage. Every sixth house in England was a “gin house,” many of which advertised, “Drunk for one penny, dead drunk for two pence, clean straw for nothing.” It was a terrible, poverty-ridden, crime-infested time.
To help heal their tortured society, some turned to brewing beer. It was lower in alcohol, it was safe—the process of brewing and the alcohol that resulted killed the germs that made water dangerous—and it was nutritious in ways scientists are only now beginning to understand. Monks brewed it, evangelicals brewed it and aspiring young entrepreneurs like Guinness brewed it. And they were respected and honored for their good works.
“Give all you can”?

So as Arthur Guinness sat in church on the day we are imagining, he was a successful brewer in Dublin, selling a drink throughout the city that made people healthier and helped them avoid the excesses of the hard liquor that had done so much damage for so many decades.
What makes this Sunday in Guinness’ life so important is who he is about to hear, because on this day John Wesley is in town. Wesley is the founder of the Methodist church, the man who started a small group at Oxford University from which a great revival grew. Wesley and his friends wanted simply to be good Christians—to “perfect holiness,” as they said—and so as they preached the Gospel, they gave to the poor and visited prisoners and raised money to serve the needy. Whole cities were changed by the preaching of John Wesley, his brother Charles and the famous George Whitefield. And now John Wesley had come to Dublin and was preaching at the soaring St. Patrick’s Cathedral. And Arthur Guinness was there.
We do not know exactly what Wesley preached, but we can know a few things. Wesley would have called the congregation at St. Patrick’s to God, of course, but he also would have had a special message for men like Guinness. It was something he taught wherever he went. “Earn all you can. Save all you can. Give all you can,” he would have insisted. “Your wealth is evidence of a calling from God, so use your abundance for the good of mankind.”
On this Sunday and on other occasions when he heard Wesley speak, Arthur Guinness got the message. He also got to work. Inspired by Wesley’s charge, Guinness poured himself in founding the first Sunday schools in Ireland. He gave vast amounts of money to the poor, sat on the board of a hospital designed to serve the needy and bravely challenged the material excesses of his own social class. He was nearly a one man army of reform.
Continue reading The Story of God and Guinness

Dublin Christian Mission Summer

We had a wonderful time at Town family camp this year. We had a great team of leaders who worked very hard all week. The discussion times with moms and Dads were really good, a real time of breakthrough this year. Thank you for all your prayers God is truly at work in the city. Please continue to remember us in your prayers.